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Leading from the front is an art

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HCM and HR services company asks whether leaders in businesses can be the disruptors. Leadership by example is a skilled practice, which few business leaders have mastered. It takes continuous dedication and commitment, and results in a strong, growing operation.

Experts in the human resource and human capital management space continue to focus on the qualities required by those who want to manage and drive businesses in today’s market.

James McKerrell, CEO of CRS Technologies, believes that true business leaders have an understanding and appreciation for the need to serve first and practice that which they ask of their employees.

CRS Technologies is an established provider of services, support and solutions targeted at the HR and HCM markets.

McKerrell says there are several skills that powerful leaders possess including communication, collaboration, mentoring, teamwork and enabling.

As part of the general mandate handed to business leaders these skills are used strategically, in a balanced way, to address challenges and are applied in a way that enhances operations quickly and effectively

“Some leaders may have these skills and be exceptionally strong in any number of them, but it is rare to come across someone in charge who has developed a keen understanding of the art of leadership,” he explains.

This is mainly because they get caught up in operational matters and forget to actually lead, McKerrell continues.

The company believes it takes more than skills to be a good leader. “A strong leader will acknowledge their own mistakes while a poor one will automatically blame others,” he adds.

However, the demise of a business can only be put down to poor leadership to a certain extent.

“Many successful organisations have poor leaders so it is difficult to blame a company’s demise on poor leadership only. If poor leadership is identified as a problem leading to a company’s decline, the leader should make way for someone else (difficult, as poor leaders often won’t acknowledge that they are the problem),” McKerrell adds.