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New revenue opportunities for African telcos

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Although Africa’s largest telco operators are generally showing growth in their customer bases, it is public knowledge that revenue growth has somewhat stalled to as little as 1% year on year. This means that despite attracting an increased number of customers, the amount each of these customers spend, is decreasing.
By Mariam Abdullahi, telco industry lead at SAP Africa
In the wake of digitally transforming economies, it is safe to assume that the traditional revenue models of voice, SMS and data revenues are eroding and may soon become irrelevant.
Thanks to a combination of maturing technology, regulatory interventions, increasing levels of sophistication and discernment among consumers, the disruption brought by free or low-cost public WiFi and Over The Top (OTT) powerhouses such as WhatsApp, traditional telco revenue streams are under severe threat.
WhatsApp and its more than 900 million active users around the world, leverage Telco infrastructure to send 30 billion messages per day at no cost. Google’s ever-expanding fibre network in the US is enabling an always-online lifestyle, while China’s WeChat not only connects its 600-million subscribers with instant messaging, but has also established itself as a digital platform providing services ranging from real-time traffic updates to mobile payments.
These OTT players have created loyal customer bases as they provide valuable services at low costs, all leveraging the infrastructure that telcos built. So, with slowing revenue growth, do telcos invest in their own OTT apps and products to start reclaiming some of the revenue and brand equity claimed by the likes of WhatsApp?
I would argue that a far better route to the continued success and growth of the African telco industry is not to look back at missed opportunities, but to rather look ahead to the emerging technologies that will shape the business and consumer landscape across the African continent. And there’s no bigger or better emerging opportunity than the Internet of Things.

The $60-trillion opportunity
With a projected 50-billion things connected by 2020, the Internet of Things is set to become one of the most significant technological innovations in history. General Electric estimates that investment into the Industrial Internet of Things will reach $60-trillion over the next 15 years, while McKinsey predicts the IoT market will attain a compound annual growth rate of 32,6% by 2020.
Within the next few decades, sensors will permeate every aspect of our lives. In this hyperconnected age, everything from cars to machines to livestock and crops will have a sensor.
In a recent collaboration between Bosch and SAP, IoT was implemented to monitor asparagus farming operations to improve yield, while also providing farmers with key insights based on accurate data that helps make them more profitable.
The possibilities are endless: for example, a refrigerator provided by a cooldrink vendor with the purpose of storing their product can be remotely monitored to ensure it is indeed stocking the intended products and provide the vendor with realtime insights into the most popular products while alerting them automatically when stocks run low.
All of this requires connectivity, and at a surface level IoT is a golden revenue opportunity for telcos. With so many ‘things’ to connect, it makes sense that telcos provide the baseline connectivity.
However, IoT works on narrowband connectivity, meaning it can operate without using telco infrastructure. It’s not enough for telcos to simply provide the infrastructure. For the IoT opportunity to benefit telcos, they need to develop a comprehensive innovation framework to take advantage of emerging opportunities and create new forms of value.

The building blocks of a reimagined telco business model
To meet the demands of a rapidly changing business and technology environment, many telcos have bolstered their digital capabilities by appointing chief digital officers.
There is an inherent risk to this, however: if it is the prerogative of one person or line-of-business to manage and drive innovation, the telco is unlikely to reap the full benefits of an innovation programme.
CEOs should encourage a culture of innovation by enabling all employees to contribute to the process, gaining input from all operational and enterprise teams to limit siloed thinking and do away with internal segregation.
Telcos should look specifically at implementing four key components to drive an effective innovation process, namely:
* An innovation strategy that highlights how the telco wants to take advantage of emerging technologies such as IoT;
* An understanding of the business models that would best support their customers’ objectives and approach to business;
* An accurate and central system of records; and
* A team of experts to ensure all components in the innovation engine work together seamlessly and effectively.
In one example, Zimabwe’s Econet works with trucking companies by leveraging IoT to collect information for insurance companies. A new business model in this context could include a partnership with the Zimbabwean government to feed data related to road conditions to the government to inform them of road issues and ensure adequate infrastructure maintenance is conducted.

The risk of a DIY mindset
Telcos have traditionally excelled at partnering with handset providers and some OTT players.
Notwithstanding, there is an undeniable occasional tendency to take a “we-can-do-it-all” approach. In the context of the emerging technologies such as IoT, partnering strategically is essential to success.
A telco need not be a sensor manufacturer to benefit from IoT.
Strategic partnerships with giants like Huawei and Samsung would make more sense. There is emerging a niche, nimble set of players that are competing with these established players in the sensor business.
The world of IT is now transformed into a Sense-Compute-Actuate phenomenon. In this context telcos should focus on their biggest asset — data – whilst forging strategic partnerships with hardware and software leaders to increase the pace of innovation.
By analysing customer data effectively, telcos can help develop new business models that are tailor-made to the needs of the modern business environment.
Companies such as GE Healthcare offer a glimpse at the possibilities: for every machine they connect in a rural hospital, GE Healthcare provides hospital management with connectivity and data on bed occupancy, day-to-day usage trends, and more, giving the hospital vital insights into its operations and creating opportunities for greater efficiency.
Telcos should work with software players as well — and this is where SAP offers immense value. Software companies have already made huge investments on practical, proven solutions to collect, analyse and process huge volumes of data. They can be considered as natural co-innovators in opportunities leading to new business models or revenue streams.
SAP’s analysis shows that almost 76% of the world’s transactions touch our very own software systems deployed by clients globally. We see the digitization era bringing in a new set of opportunities to bring our vision of making the world run better and simpler a reality.
However, it is critical that telcos move fast: major global tech firms such as Google, Facebook and Microsoft are all investing in new connectivity solutions for emerging markets.
If they work, the telcos will become even less essential to the success of these companies or the needs of their customers. If telcos don’t invest in finding innovative ways of supporting these companies, they will simply do it themselves.
The opportunity cost could run into trillions of dollars.
While African telcos have been helped by the slow pace of smartphone adoption on the continent, this is likely to change as low-cost smartphones permeate the market.
The availability of exponential technologies, increasing levels of customer sophistication, and the growing availability of broadband and alternative connectivity options are all putting pressure on telco revenues.
After 20 years of relatively manageable business conditions, telcos are facing a far more competitive and disruptive business environment.
Right now, telcos have the luxury of investing in innovation and reinventing their business models. The first gold rush is over. But there are more gold seams — from IoT to lifestyle services and more — offering greater revenue opportunities than ever before. It is critical that they heed the warning signs and find new ways of delivering value to businesses and consumers.