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Cabbages & Kings: The season of uncertainty

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It’s a season of uncertainty right now. 

As far as the weather is concerned we are teetering on the brink of uncertainty. Long-range forecasts suggest the summer is going to start out hot and dry and that the dreaded el Nino effect, aggravated by global warming, could linger and lead to a drought – or move to the opposite extreme with widespread flooding.
The global economy is not faring too well either. A roller-coaster ride on equity markets over the past few weeks – apparently linked to the sub-prime market and a surprise reduction in interest rates in the United States – has the bears and bulls just a little more than totally confused.
The ICT industry, always a little confusing and not always terribly certain about its future, also seems to be caught up in the season of uncertainty.
On-again, off-again rumours and talks about mergers and acquisitions continue to characterise the industry, along with start-stop decisions related to the regulatory environment governing issues such as undersea cables, local loop unbundling, value-added network service licences, the establishment of Infraco and funding for Sentech.
And let’s not forget the national lottery. The only thing certain about "tatta ma chance" right now is that the tender process was an unmitigated disaster.
Then there’s the uncertainty surrounding the run-up to the ANC national congress in December and who will be elected to lead the party and the country and whether or not the tri-partheid alliance will survive.
After the bitter disappointment of the Proteas being blown out of race for the World Twenty20 crown, a little uncertainty may now have crept into how the Springboks will fare as they prepare to take on Tonga on their way to perhaps repeating 1995 World Cup glory.
Let’s hope the Boks come to our rescue – that by the final whistle on 20 October we reclaim the Rugby World Cup.
With nothing more than just this milestone out of the way, the uncertainties surrounding anything else would be far easier to face up to.
– David Bryant