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Women in IT endows bursary winners

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Women in IT has announced the three winners of academic bursaries for 2008. They are Chuma Nombewu from Tshwane University of Technology, Nomonde Malanda from the University of Natal and Legogang Motiang from the University of Pretoria. 

All three winners are in their final year of study in various aspects of IT.
"These three young ladies all have very different stories to tell.  Nombewu has a great passion for programming – she calls it a "mind exercising subject," says Women in IT's Christine Erwee.
Malanda is a hardworking and very determined lady from a disadvantaged background.  "However, she says that "excuses are for losers, winners meet challenges head-on" – it was this attitude and air of independence that made her one of our bursary winners this year."
Motiang is a positive and strong student.  "She is able to stand on her own two feet and make things happen.
"Once they have completed their degrees this year, anyone of these three ladies would be an asset to an IT company," says Erwee.
Last year, Women in IT awarded two bursaries to students studying IT.  Both have proven to be excellent students.
"Nokukhanya Sigasa told us in her motivational letter that 2007 would be her year to shine.  This has proven to be true.  With the help of the bursary, she has been able to further her studies while lightening the financial burden on her mother.  Sigasa will be looking for a position at the end of this year and is keen to become a web-page designer utilising both her programming and creative flair.
"Our second bursary winner for 2007 is Kgaugelo Maila who says that the bursary has helped her become a more confident person, who tries her best in everything she does."
All the bursary winners are on a strict tracking programme run by Women in IT.
"Our bursary holders have to commit to a year-long process of report backs and we monitor their academic achievements.  We are also looking for mentors for these bright young women to help them through the pitfalls of academia and then into their choice of careers," says Erwee.