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The move towards single device personal computing

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Judging by the latest advancements in the production of mobile & wireless hardware and the increased level of functionality, it is clear that manufacturers targeting the global mobile and wireless market are moving rapidly towards the launch of all-in-one devices, writes Gary Naidoo, deputy MD at Sahara.

This seems to be the overall objective behind the investment in research and development within this ultra competitive area of trade.
Consumer requirements today focus on solutions that allow for problem-free access to a number of multimedia applications, the ability to store, retrieve and manage data, connect and transmit large files at high-speed.
The main reason is because current and emerging notebook solutions are designed for multi-use – there is a concerted effort by manufacturers to marry functions that allow the user to benefit from a centralised workstation that also doubles up as an entertainment centre.
The average consumer is well aware of advances in IT and the widespread roll out of cost effective, quality product to areas that have previously never really benefited from technology.
There is an understanding that greater access, more innovation and higher levels of adoption equate to lower pricing. It is no secret that people want the convenience of mobile technology at competitive rates.
A single point of application and access to all digital facilities is the mark of today’s digital lifestyle. There are signs that all areas of the mobile & wireless space are beginning to converge and offerings are being streamlined.
On the notebook side, for example, we see a concerted effort by global technology manufacturers to focus on compact devices designed specifically for portability and anywhere computing.
The bonus for consumers is that this is being accomplished without sacrificing fundamentals like reliable connectivity, speed and performance.
The strength of wireless connectivity through the incorporation of technologies like HSDPA and 3G adds to the generally higher level of functionality in product.
Whether the product is entry level or targeted at the high-end space for ultra-mobile professionals, the idea is to integrate functionality to provide the quality of ‘all-in-one’ computing.
Another key aspect of the growing ICT and mobile space is the positive influence it has on the development and release of next generation digital lifestyle equipment. We see evidence of this in the depth and quality of ranges of peripheral devices that can be easily integrated with mobile solutions.
The mobile office is now an established and understood concept and its appeal is widened through the introduction of sophisticated personal computing devices.
While it is encouraging to witness proactive trade and supply in this marketplace, issues like bandwidth, access to basic technology, urgency behind skills development and the like continue to influence the pace of innovation and transfer of genuine benefit.
We must not forget that among the core principles upon which mobility is founded is the transfer of basic technical advantages to everyone. Benefits should not be exclusive to just one user group.