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Bloem’s boytjie tables desktop plan

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Computex, Taiwan – Leader Yeh, GM of Gigazone and a 'regte South African boytjie' who used to head up Rectron in Bloemfontein, says he is convinced he can rescue the desktop PC market by, quite literally, putting the "desk back into desktop".

We wrote about Yeh in 2008 when we were last at Computex as a South African who has made good in the cutthroat environment that is IT in Taiwan by coming up with new concepts in an ever-churning market.
At this year's Computex, Yeh showed us around his latest concept – a DIY desk with fittings such as brackets already built-in to accomodate a user's PC.
Many South Africans of a certain age will be familiar with the days of DIY furniture that used to be delivered by companies such as Semble-It. Yeh has taken this to a new level by adding brackets into which motherboards can be slotted, attachments for speakers and fans, slots for monitors, ready-cut holes for cabling, and a drawer for keyboard and mouse.
The whole package has the added benefit of being boxed in a seven-inch wide carton, making shipping of these products in large volumes more viable.
"You can literally pack thousands of these kits in a container," Yeh says. "How many traditional desks would you be able to fit in?"
Yeh says that the desks could herald a revival of desktop PCs which have taken a battering of late.
"Think about it," he says. "Everyone wants their child to have a desk at home to sit and study at. With these desks they not only study, but can then use them for their gaming or for viewing or for social networking.
"If you take it one step further … schools also need desks … so do home workers," he adds.
Yeh says that while the DIY desks are a concept at present, he is looking to take them to market by next year.
And price? Yeh says this is another area where the product will stand out.
"I estimate that I'll be able to sell the desks at around $30.00," he says. "You can't get better value than that."
Seems the Boytjie from Bloem may once again be making his presence felt in the Taiwanese IT sector.