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PayU launches recurring payment solution

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PayU has launched a real time recurring (RTR) offering, PayU Xpress, that is set to boost security and convenience for both retailers and consumers.
The solution provides South Africa’s eCommerce stores with a platform for their shift to a one-click checkout, offering increased customer engagement and the potential for increased sales through improved customer conversions.
“It is our conviction that shoppers just want payments to ‘happen’ and not to be an integral part of the online checkout experience. With RTR we can achieve this,” says Karen Nadasen, country manager of PayU South Africa.
“Data shows that where shoppers are able to virtually tap and go whenever they see an item at a retailer they trust, they are more likely to purchase impulse items and keep returning to the same site for further service,” Nadasen says. “Online operators have experienced a drop off as significant as 30% due to poor functionality and user accessibility – it is a costly mistake to make.”
One-click checkout services have been implemented by numerous retailers over the past few years, with brands such as Amazon, PayPal and Uber taking advantage of its potential and capability. These merchants long since recognised the value of convenience and the importance of customer experiences in an increasingly customer-controlled world.
Uber’s payment platform uses RTR to accept recurrent payments upfront. For Visa Checkout and PayPal, the solution gives their customers a central stop for all their payment options. Amazon Mobile Payments has been available since early 2016 to overcome the barriers around mobile conversion and, along with one-click and Amazon Payments, is one of the reasons why the company achieved $107-billion in sales in 2015.
The World Wide Worx Online Retail in South Africa 2016 report has found that online retail in the country is growing at a steady rate and it is expected to reach 1% of the total spend for the first time this year. The fact that shoppers still only spend small amounts may be ascribed to legacy issues hindering adoption, but can ultimately benefit the retailer if frequency of payments increases with the right payment solution in place.
Ultimately, some of the biggest barriers to customer conversion are delays, complexity and security on mobile devices, frustrating input methods. Mobile devices are with people 73% of the time according to Facebook and according to a Google/Ipsos study, 29% of users will switch to another site if the one they are on is too slow.
With PayU Xpress, consumers need only enter their details on their first purchase. The platform becomes their central payment repository for as long as they require. PayU offers additional fraud protection for merchants and consumers as users have the option to activate 3D Secure on a user’s first transaction without having to do it every time. For the retailer, the addition of the PayU Xpress button to their payment page is quick and easy so their consumers can use the feature as needed.
“PayU Xpress delivers a shopping experience which is safe, easy and requires only a single click for authentication,” explains Nadasen. “It is the ideal option for eCommerce stores looking to drive richer engagement and improve conversion rates, and gives returning customers a simple and safe space in which to transact. The system uses a PCI-DSS level 1 certified card tokenization service to assure all users of complete security throughout.”
PayU Xpress has been designed to simplify the checkout experience and bring a high-level of online sophistication to South Africa’s e-commerce culture and its simple system and easy controls will give the online merchant the support they need when it comes to reassuring the careful customer.

  • Notwithstanding the otherwise constant stream of disingenuous and delusional nonsense that flows from eBay/PayPal, the share price history of these two clunky operators demonstrates the reality:

    Aug 2007: (pre John Donahoe) EBAY ~$40; AMZN ~$40;
    Jul 2015 (pre eBay-PayPal split): EBAY ~$66; AMZN ~$480;
    Jul 2015 (post-split): EBAY ~$28; PYPL ~$37; AMZN ~$530;
    Recently: EBAY ~$31; PYPL ~$37; AMZN ~$760—LOL …

    PayPal is still standing still, and eBay has for years been effectively going backwards …

    Notwithstanding the “spin-off” of PayPal from eBay, eBay and “PreyPal” remain effectively joined at the hip—for at least the next five years—and anyone that thinks otherwise is simply uninformed; and, thanks to a continuation of most of the destructive policies introduced over the eight year reign (2007–2015) of the “Pain from Bain”, John Joseph Donahoe II, the eBay marketplace is continuing on its slow journey down the toilet; nevertheless, during Johnny Ho’s occupation of the eBay corner office, this cretin and his gang of hand-picked Keystone Kops still managed to obtain for themselves massive, unearned, “performance” bonuses—while the company’s shareholders received not one penny.

    PayPal is a clunky, non-bank-licensed (except in Luxembourg), non-deposit-insured, virtually non-regulated, “pretend” bank; a higher fee-charging payments intermediary that, in the main, rides on the back of the world’s banks’ existing payments systems, with no formal agreement with those banks other than PayPal’s operating of a credit card merchant account facility with, and the making of direct debits/credits on some users’ bank accounts via, one of those real banks.

    PayPal is, in its own words, “a merchant of sorts”; it is not a licensed “bank”; virtually everything that “PreyPal” does is done via “marketing” arrangements with licensed financial institutions—for example, look for the identity of the actual credit provider (in the micro print) on their credit providing instruments.

    Merchants’ funds received via “PreyPal” are at risk of being subjected to lengthy arbitrary holds; $18 billion of users’ funds left “on deposit” with the PayPal faux “bank” are not FDIC deposit-insured. Even more perilous (for PayPal’s shareholders), the great majority of PayPal’s business originates from its (still) effectively mandated place on the eBay marketplace, so it logically follows that—with the destructive Johnny Ho-Ho-Ho now sitting at the head of the PayPal boardroom table—”PreyPal” will undoubtedly be accompanying eBay on its journey to the sewage farm.

    “Effective October 1, 2015, we will remove the tiered merchant rates for US domestic and international Purchase Payments*. This means your rate will increase if you are currently receiving a merchant volume discount. Your new rate will be the standard rate of 2.9% + $0.30 USD for domestic transactions and 3.9% + fixed fee** for international transactions.”—PayPal, 27 Aug 2015.

    The reality is, PayPal’s parasitic, higher fee-charging payments operation has little long-term future—outside of its mandated place on the atrophying eBay marketplace—now that professional online/mobile payments offerings from MasterCard (“MasterPass”) and Visa (“Visa Checkout”) are available to any online merchant that has (or can obtain) a credit card merchant account with a real bank.

    With respect particularly to “mobile” payments, notwithstanding Apple Pay’s disappointing initial showing, methinks Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Android Pay, “MasterPass”, and “Visa Checkout”, that is, those entities that have formal relationships with the world’s retail banks and MasterCard/Visa, will eventually bury PayPal’s parasitic operation.

    By using PayPal you forego the usual statutory protections that apply to credit card transactions. Nevertheless, PayPal users should never give PayPal an authority to direct debit their bank account; PayPal should only ever be given access to funds via a real-bank credit card account; that way your credit card-issuing bank will be the final arbiter of any transaction dispute. Conversely, sellers should never accept payment via PayPal for goods that are going to be picked up by the buyer; in such circumstances PayPal offers sellers zero protection from “item not received” scammers .

    PayPal is effectively a “pay day” lender. In May 2015, PayPal was fined $10 million over its “Bill Me Later” service, in part for unfairly charging some customers deferred-interest fees. The company was also required to return $15 million to consumers who used the service, which is now called PayPal Credit.

    PayPal’s one-time adoptive parent, eBay, is likely the most unscrupulous commercial entity operating on this planet; but, have no fear, eBay is an equal-opportunity fraudster; demonstrably, they will knowingly aid and abet the defrauding of buyers by unscrupulous eBay merchants who bid on their own auctions, and, conversely, of honest sellers by unscrupulous buyers—as long as there is a financial benefit in such fraud for eBay.

    And if anyone thinks that the clunky “PreyPal” is any more scrupulous than eBay—given their equally poor customer service and lack of any truly balanced mediation of transaction disputes by human beings, which effectively results in a hard-wired bias towards buyers/payers that they now necessarily have to pander to—good luck to all you small online merchants who may get burned in the process.

    For a detailed analysis of the ugly reality of eBay’s demonstrable, calculated, facilitation of endemic shill bidding fraud on consumers on its auctions marketplace—Google “Shill Bidding on eBay: Case Study #5”

    And, goodbye clunky PayPal—it’s not been nice knowing you—Google “Retail Payments: The Reality” …