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What’s next for Galaxy Note7 users?

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Following reports of Samsung Galaxy Note7 batteries exploding, Samsung – which has already stopped the sale of these handsets – will voluntarily replace users’ current devices over the coming weeks.

“Samsung cares for its loyal and supportive customers first and foremost,” says Craige Fleischer, director of integrated mobility at Samsung Electronics South Africa. “Our customers are very important to us and their safety is a key concern for Samsung. There is, after all, more to our relationship with consumers than simply sales and financial gain.

“As the Galaxy Note7 had not been officially launched in the South African market at the time the battery cell challenges were identified, we took the decision not to release the handset into the South African market until these challenges are overcome. As such, the Galaxy Note 7 will be available in South Africa in November,” says Fleischer.

On 14 September, Samsung announced it would be releasing a software update to help reduce the risk of incidents relating to the battery cell issues by limiting the maximum battery charge to 60%. Adoption of the software update could vary by each market depending on market situation and local requirements.

“When the Galaxy Note7 is launched in South Africa, our customers will receive devices that offers full battery usage,” says Fleischer.

He believes that while the delay in the launch of the Galaxy Note7 in South Africa is disappointing, it will be worth the wait for consumers.

“We would like to thank all our loyal customers and those who pre-ordered the Note7 for their continued support and trust in the Samsung brand,” Fleisher adds.

“The Galaxy Note7 will take the smart phone to the next level in terms of design, power and performance, providing users with a seamless transition between work and play. Moreover, the new phone offers additional features, such as water resistance and upgraded security features, including the latest iris scanning technology, the first of its kind to be available in South Africa.”